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Algoza
Flute
Shehnai
Been
Harmonium
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Rawanhattha
Rawanhattha - Said to be one of the oldest known string instruments, it is rare to find it now-a-days. Made of a long piece of bamboo set into a dry coconut, it has one main playing string and many others for a drone. It is played with a bow and is still popular in Rajasthan, especially with the Bhopa community.
Algoza
Algoza -A double flute made of bamboo, the algoza works on the same principle as a bagpipe and is a tricky instrument to master. One of the two flutes usually plays a continuous drone while the other plays different notes. The player has to master the art of breathing without letting the sound of the algoza break even for a bit
String
Tambur
Riwana
Toomba
Sarangi
Violin
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Percussion

Dhol
Dholak
Mirdang
Tabla
Kansi
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Wind
 
Algoza
Bansuri (Flute)
Been
Harmonium
Shehnai
Algoza -A double flute made of bamboo, the algoza works on the same principle as a bagpipe and is a tricky instrument to master. One of the two flutes usually plays a continuous drone while the other plays different notes. The player has to master the art of breathing without letting the sound of the algoza break even for a bit Bansuri (Flute) - Also known as the flute, it hardly needs any introduction given its global popularity. It is a simple bamboo stick with one hole to blow into and 6, 8 or 9 holes for producing the notes. Been - Made popular by snake charmers, it has 2 pipes made of wood, bamboo or metal and set into a gourd. One produces a drone and the other can produce many notes using the holes. Great stamina is required to play it. Harmonium - One of the most popular and widespread instruments today, the Harmonium is a foreigner to India. Similar to the organ in its functioning, the Harmonium needs no tuning but a lot of practice for its playing. Shehnai - is a double reed instrument with a pipe that has seven holes and a trumpet of brass or copper attached at the end. So popular for creating background music at weddings, that it is almost synonymous with them. Mostly used for playing classical msuci, It is played as a folk instrument in many parts including the hills of Himachal.
String
 
Tambur / Chautara Riwana Toomba Sarangi
Violin
Tambur / Chautara - A variation of the Ancient Ektara, the Chautara is one of the oldest string instruments. It is made of wood with a base usually of Gourd and has four strings that can be tuned to different pitches. It is played with two fingers and produces an accompanying drone. Riwana - a beautiful carved instrument made of wood that is getting quite rare these days. This version is played by musicians in the Himachal hills. Much like a guitar, it is played with a pick in one hand and pressing the strings against the fret board with the other. Toomba - A two stringed instrument quite like the single stringed Ektara. It is primarily a drone instrument though skilled players produce many notes with it. The wires are stretched across a bamboo set into a gourd with a skin covering its side. Sarangi - a very important string instrument used in both the folk and classical styles. Its sound is considered to be the closest to the human voice. Made with a hollow piece of wood, covered by a parchment, it usually has three main playing strings but several others for a drone. It is played with a bow. Violin - A western version of the Sarangi perhaps, the violin has been incorporated into many folk artistes repertoire for its soulful sound. We found it accompanying many of the Bhajan mandalis in the Malwa belt.
 
Rawanhattha Sarangi Ektara Ektara  
Rawanhattha - Said to be one of the oldest known string instruments, it is rare to find it now-a-days. Made of a long piece of bamboo set into a dry coconut, it has one main playing string and many others for a drone. It is played with a bow and is still popular in Rajasthan, especially with the Bhopa community. Sarangi - The Sarangi has many variants. What we found in the Mathura area of Uttar Pradesh was a simpler version of the Sarangi, with a smaller round head, fewer strings and ghunghroos attached to the bow. e Ektara - There are many kinds of Ektaras though the name literally means one wire and so that is its main component. It could be stretched across a thin bamboo set into a gourd or a wooden base. It is played in many parts but is especially popular with the Baul fakirs of Bengal. Khamak - A small instrument capable of producing a very interesting sound, it is a one sided small drum with the other side left open to insert a string. Pulling the string to alter the tension of the side stretched with a goat skin changes the sound. .  
 
  Percussion
 
Dhol
Dholak
Mridang
Tabla
Kansi
Dhol - Synonymous with Punjabi music, especially nowadays, it is a large two sided drum made of wood. The left side is coated to give it a heavier sound. Tightened cords with metal rings keep the sides taut and wooden sticks are used to play it. Dholak - One of the most important percussive instruments accompanying folk music all over the country. It is made of a cylindrical barrel hollowed out of a block of wood with equal-sized open ends covered with goatskin. It is played on both sides with the fingers sometimes with sticks.

Mridang - Another two sided drum, it is usually longer than the dholak and is considered be one of the oldest instruments. The left side is larger and coated with a material, even wet flour in the most basic instruments, to produce the heavier sound.

Tabla -an important modern instrument, it is widely used with music and dance in India. The ancient instrument Pakhawaj is said to be the mother of the Tabla and it is said that Amir Khusro, in the 14 th century, divided Pakhawaj into two parts and invented a new instrument called Tabla. Kansi - A one sided drum with the other side left open, it is played with one hand and kept taut with the help of cords and metal rings. This version is played in the hills of Himachal.
 
Dhak
Hudka
Dhad
Timki (Bongo)
Matka
Dhak - A large two sided drum, it is not commonly found. This version was found in southern Rajasthan. Fairly complex to play, it requires the use of the feet to tighten the cords to produce different notes and the hands to strike it. Hudka - A descendent of lord Shiva's Drum, the Damru, a Hudka is the most important instrument in the hills of Uttranchal. Made of wood in an hourglass shape, it is covered by a goatskin on both sides. The player hangs it on one shoulder and controls the tension of the goatskin by pulling it farther from his shoulder or bringing it close. Dhad - a small hour glass shaped drum, the dhad is very popular in the folk music of Punjab. Cords tighten its two goat skin sides and the player produces different notes by tightening its cords with one hand while tapping the side with the other. Timki (Bongo) - a bongo that has been adapted for use with the folk songs of many regions including Malwa. It consists of a pair of one sided drums played with wooden sticks. Matka - Literally a pot, clay or metal, it is played with rings worn on the fingers.
         
Kartal Dabo Thali Kartal Manjira
Kartal - The word Kartal literally means rhythm of the hand. Made of wooden blocks with holes for the fingers and circular copper plates, pairs of Kartals are played with both hands. Kartals usually accompany religious music. Dabo - a large drum that is held up with one hand and played with the other. This version was found in the highest reaches of the Himalayas in the Spiti region. Thali - Literally means a metal plate and that is exactly what it is. Turned upside down and played with two sticks, it provides simple percussion. It is very popular in Uttaranchal. Kartal - a distinctive instrument used in the Biraha singing by the Ahir community, this Kartal consists of two sets of two iron bars. Almost a foot long and tapered at both ends the players hold these loosely in both hands and they create a high-pitched clang when rapidly struck against each other. Manjira - The most inexpensive and easy to play Instrument, the Manjira accompanies all kinds of singing, especially devotional. It is made of two small copper plates tied together with a string. Hitting one against the other at its edge produces its high pitched sound.
 
Chimta Nakkara Khanjari    
Chimta - The name is taken from the household tongs and the instrument itself is a long iron strip bent double and small metal discs attached to its length. When the arms are struck against each other, the discs produce a loud clanging sound. Most often the chimta accompanies the Bhanra dance. l. Nakkara - a large one sided drum made of metal, the Nakkara is traditionally a war drum, used to herald the arrival of kings. Its skin is kept taut with leather strips stretched across its body and it is played with wooden sticks. Khanjari - A circular piece of flat metal with smaller discs attached to its rim that produce a clanging sound when struck with the palm of the hand.    
 
     
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